Where are the Invasive Aedes Mosquitoes in Los Angeles County?

The three invasive species are the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) and Australian backyard mosquito (Aedes notoscriptus) do not belong in our natural Southern California environment.

These species are a public health concern throughout the US, including California since they can transmit Zika virus, dengue fever, yellow fever and chikungunya. See where else they are in the state (PDF).

These mosquitoes adapt very well to urban environments (cities). Once introduced, they can thrive in our neighborhoods.

yellow fever mosquito

yellow fever mosquito

Aedes aegypti (uh-gyp-tie) Confirmed in GLACVCD

  • Artesia
  • Avocado Heights (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Bell
  • Bell Gardens
  • Bellflower
  • Boyle Heights (City of L.A.)
  • Burbank
  • Carson
  • Central Alameda (City of L.A.)
  • Cerritos
  • City Terrace (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Commerce
  • Cudahy
  • Diamond Bar
  • Downey
  • Eagle Rock (City of L.A.)
  • East Hollywood (City of L.A.)
  • East Los Angeles (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • El Sereno (City of L.A.)
  • Elysian Valley (City of L.A.)
  • Florence/Graham (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Glendale
  • Hacienda Heights (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Hawaiian Gardens
  • Highland Park (City of L.A.)
  • Historic South Central (City of L.A. – 90007)
  • Huntington Park
  • La Crescenta-Montrose (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Lake View Terrace (City of L.A.)
  • Lakewood
  • La Mirada
  • Lynwood
  • Maywood
  • Mission Hills
  • Montebello
  • Montecito Heights (City of L.A.)
  • Mount Washington
  • Norwalk
  • Pacoima (City of L.A.)
  • Paramount
  • Pico Rivera
  • Reseda
  • Rowland Heights
  • San Fernando
  • San Marino
  • San Pedro
  • Santa Fe Springs
  • Silver Lake (City of L.A.)
  • South El Monte
  • South Gate
  • South Whittier (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Sun Valley (City of L.A.)
  • Tujunga (City of L.A.)
  • Valencia (City of Santa Clarita)
  • Valley Glen (City of L.A.)
  • Valley Village (City of L.A.)
  • Van Nuys (City of L.A.)
  • Whittier
  • Willowbrook (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Winnetka (City of L.A.)
  • Woodland Hills (City of L.A.)
Asian tiger mosquito

Asian tiger mosquito

Aedes albopictus (al-bow-pick-tus) Confirmed in GLACVCD

  • Atwater Village (City of L.A.)
  • Bassett (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Avocado Heights (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Eagle Rock (City of L.A.)
  • Echo Park (City of L.A.)
  • Glassell Park (City of L.A.)
  • Historic South Central (City of L.A. – 90007)
  • La Cañada Flintridge
  • La Mirada
  • Long Beach (90815)
  • Montebello
  • Pellisier Village(unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Pico Rivera
  • San Marino
  • Silver Lake (City of L.A.)
  • South El Monte
  • South Whittier (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Whittier
Australian backyard mosquito

Australian backyard mosquito (credit: OCMVCD)

Aedes notoscriptus Confirmed in GLACVCD

  • Eagle Rock (City of L.A.)
  • Echo Park (City of L.A.)
  • El Sereno (City of L.A.)
  • Elysian Valley (City of L.A.)
  • Hacienda Heights (unincorporated L.A. County)
  • Highland Park (City of L.A.)
  • La Habra Heights
  • Montebello
  • Montecito Heights (City of L.A.)
  • San Pedro (City of L.A.)
  • Silver Lake (City of L.A.)

How Are They Threats to Our Life in the Cities?

The Asian tiger mosquito and yellow fever mosquito (both popularly known as “invasive Aedes mosquitoes”) have the potential to transmit debilitating viruses. These diseases have not been transmitted locally (no local outbreak).

However, if a person with the virus spends time in an area where these mosquitoes are found, there is an increased chance of an outbreak occurring in Los Angeles County. Currently, many people visiting known Zika outbreak locations in the U.S. are capable of returning to L.A. County infected — and may not even know it.

Learn more:

The Australian backyard mosquito is a concern for the veterinary community since it can transmit canine heartworm.

These daytime biters can ruin a family get-together or a warm day at a park. Normally, we expect mosquitoes to bite from dusk to dawn – not so with these invasive mosquitoes.
Do you have an old tire in your yard? Or maybe some plant cuttings in a bucket of water in your kitchen?

These mosquitoes can lay their eggs in stagnant water sources as small as a bottle cap! There have been reports in Los Angeles County of these mosquitoes biting people inside offices and homes.

How to Find & Eliminate Them in the Yard and Inside Your Home or Office

Get rid of standing water. These mosquitoes can live and complete their life cycle indoors or outdoors, wherever standing water can be found. And they can complete their life cycle in about a week!

Invasive mosquito life cycle

Want to get rid of mosquitoes? Click HERE for helpful tips.